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  #21  
Old 03-26-2013, 05:08 PM
mcjnic mcjnic is offline
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Default Re: tie dye kit in the makings

Get with Jonnistix on the edges. He does them by hand as that wood is pretty soft. He's done a bunch of them and I believe he's even done some videos on it. Good guy.
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  #22  
Old 03-26-2013, 07:08 PM
jccabinets jccabinets is offline
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Default Re: tie dye kit in the makings

+ 1 on Jonnistix ( I spell it different every time) the guy is a wizard.

Robyn, I lost the thread while I was in Houston but now Im back and cant wait to see youy tie dye drums.
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  #23  
Old 03-26-2013, 07:14 PM
jccabinets jccabinets is offline
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Default Re: tie dye kit in the makings

One more thought, I think the fabric should be glued down. If you rely on the lugs holding it down then Im pretty sure you will be getting some wrinkles, of course then you could iron them out,,lol! No but really think about some general adhesive that could be spread on very thin with a notched trowel with like 1/16th notches or smaller. Let me think some more on this.
It would be nice to get some kind of clear finish on the fabric, thats why the wrinkles would be bad.
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  #24  
Old 03-26-2013, 09:01 PM
robyn64 robyn64 is offline
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Default Re: tie dye kit in the makings

Quote:
Originally Posted by jccabinets View Post
One more thought, I think the fabric should be glued down. If you rely on the lugs holding it down then Im pretty sure you will be getting some wrinkles, of course then you could iron them out,,lol! No but really think about some general adhesive that could be spread on very thin with a notched trowel with like 1/16th notches or smaller. Let me think some more on this.
It would be nice to get some kind of clear finish on the fabric, thats why the wrinkles would be bad.
so would you suggest a hot or just warm iron to take out them wrinkles? lol. i still have the idea of using some glue, actually got a cup'l ideas floating around in my head and am willing too take in other ideas too, then i will weigh them all out to see which will work best.
would also like to do some type of clear coat over the fabric too but not sure what to use, what would work best. let me know when you come up with some ideas.
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  #25  
Old 03-26-2013, 09:09 PM
robyn64 robyn64 is offline
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Default Re: tie dye kit in the makings

just ordered the fabric for the wraps. will be about cup'l weeks b4 it gets here. hope i can wait that long. i'm getting more and more excited bout this project as time goes by.
i decided to go with pattern #1
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  #26  
Old 03-26-2013, 10:19 PM
jonnistix jonnistix is offline
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Default Re: tie dye kit in the makings

Quote:
Originally Posted by robyn64 View Post
hey guys i got the kick all stripped down, and found that the edges are pretty much flat. so do i need to round them up? and if so...do i round them like the others are or angle them?
also found that the floor tom is painted on the inside too, so thinking the snare, ft n kick may of all came from the same set then added the 12 n 13.
been kinda curious about this kit every since i saw it. i know it is not vintage or really anything special (only in my book) but i also know it is not just your every day MIJ from the factory either. i'm thinking someone pieced it together. guess i just been thinking too much, lol. it does have me curious.
As mcjnic suggested, I do mine by hand. If you are adept at the feel of wood in your hands, you can get them pretty even. It is laborious, but the results are far superior to trying your hand at routering a circle...
Step 1) Use low grit to start, say 80-100. BE CAREFUL you can indeed remove too much wood. I use, on this type of shell, the newest TAMA profile, if you want more attack and less resonance. A slightly more round-over version for added resonance, but these shells are lacking in deep, booming resonant tones, for the most part. They harbor a higher pitch and tone than do the thinner 3 ply/rings shells. Work carefully, but continuously around to ensure a better level.
Step 2) move to 100-120 to get them more into shape and contour. This is self explanatory, but care is required none the less.
Step 3) Move up to 200 and this should be the final step. CARE must be taken to get them smooth as silk so the heads make good, even and unencumbered contact with the shell. I either wax or don't but make certain there is no paint residue left at the contact point as it will get warm and sticky with play due to the heat generated from play, causing the heads to slightly stick and get "lopsided" in tuning.
Step 3) You cant also use a more Gretsch like profile for these shells and get "That Great Gretsch Sound" on the way cheap, it's roughly 30* to roundover, 30 being just at the last contact area to the inside with the roundover to the outside making them get the most attack and resonance/sustain these shells have to offer.
Step 4) Become the local Guru on tuning. I highly recommend using the Evans/Bob Gatzen series to get better, if not perfect, at the best of tuning styles.

Good luck and good playing! Hope my insight helps.
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Last edited by jonnistix; 03-26-2013 at 10:22 PM.
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  #27  
Old 03-26-2013, 11:02 PM
robyn64 robyn64 is offline
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Default Re: tie dye kit in the makings

Quote:
Originally Posted by jonnistix View Post
As mcjnic suggested, I do mine by hand. If you are adept at the feel of wood in your hands, you can get them pretty even. It is laborious, but the results are far superior to trying your hand at routering a circle...
Step 1) Use low grit to start, say 80-100. BE CAREFUL you can indeed remove too much wood. I use, on this type of shell, the newest TAMA profile, if you want more attack and less resonance. A slightly more round-over version for added resonance, but these shells are lacking in deep, booming resonant tones, for the most part. They harbor a higher pitch and tone than do the thinner 3 ply/rings shells. Work carefully, but continuously around to ensure a better level.
Step 2) move to 100-120 to get them more into shape and contour. This is self explanatory, but care is required none the less.
Step 3) Move up to 200 and this should be the final step. CARE must be taken to get them smooth as silk so the heads make good, even and unencumbered contact with the shell. I either wax or don't but make certain there is no paint residue left at the contact point as it will get warm and sticky with play due to the heat generated from play, causing the heads to slightly stick and get "lopsided" in tuning.
Step 3) You cant also use a more Gretsch like profile for these shells and get "That Great Gretsch Sound" on the way cheap, it's roughly 30* to roundover, 30 being just at the last contact area to the inside with the roundover to the outside making them get the most attack and resonance/sustain these shells have to offer.
Step 4) Become the local Guru on tuning. I highly recommend using the Evans/Bob Gatzen series to get better, if not perfect, at the best of tuning styles.

Good luck and good playing! Hope my insight helps.
thanks for your help jonnistix. i'm pretty confedent that i could do this by hand, much better then with a router. have used them b4 but not enuf to be experianced at it. i pretty much follow you on your explanation except for i'm not sure what the newest Tama profile is, i think i have an idea but not sure. would you happen to have a photo to show what you mean? I do want more attack and less resonance from my drums so the tama profile would be what i want, right?

and just out of curiousity...what kind of sound will i get out of them if i was to leave them as is?
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Last edited by robyn64; 03-26-2013 at 11:16 PM. Reason: to ask another question
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  #28  
Old 03-28-2013, 01:38 PM
robyn64 robyn64 is offline
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Default Re: tie dye kit in the makings

ok the flat edges on the kick are now round edges, kinda like an upside down U. the u shape is kinda lopsided to the outside of the shell, with the rounded side being more to the inside. will this work? i sure hope so, i'm tired of all this sanding. drums were made for hitting and i'm wanting to hit them.
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  #29  
Old 03-28-2013, 02:39 PM
robyn64 robyn64 is offline
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Default Re: tie dye kit in the makings

been doing more thinking.....after i get this kit all done and back together to play, the only thing it will be missing is badges. how will these drums be able to be identified if it has no badges??? thinking i might make some but not sure of design yet, i'll do some more thinkig on that. lol.
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  #30  
Old 03-28-2013, 04:50 PM
tnsquint tnsquint is offline
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Default Re: tie dye kit in the makings

Quote:
Originally Posted by robyn64 View Post
ok the flat edges on the kick are now round edges, kinda like an upside down U. the u shape is kinda lopsided to the outside of the shell, with the rounded side being more to the inside. will this work? i sure hope so, i'm tired of all this sanding. drums were made for hitting and i'm wanting to hit them.
Your description sounds correct. The reality is that the kick drum will be the most forgiving drum in the kit as far as edges go due to low fundamental note. I bet you will be fine. As to badges...heck ya! Make some. That will be awesome.
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