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Old 08-10-2011, 03:54 PM
Purdie Shuffle Purdie Shuffle is offline
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Default Tutorial: How To Du Duco Paint-jobs!

Hi All,

I received a lot of compliments and good reviews on a 59' Club Date kit
that I restored recently. (see photos below) Mostly what People like is the
paint job. It's a two-color Duco finish using Krylon high gloss Hunter Green
spray lacquer top and bottom and Metallic Gold (dark) lacquer for the center
stripe. What made the results possible was an old turntable I used to spin the
drum shells while I painted. You don't have to be a pro to paint a professional
looking Duco finish on your old orphans.

I have created a couple of illustrations for you that pretty much covers it all.
It's basically a two step process that you will repeat several times. I promise
you that if you take your time, and do it carefully, you will be rewarded with
mind-blowing results.

TIPS:

1. It's important to properly prep the surface for paint. After a thorough
cleaning I will tape out all holes from the inside and carefully tape out the
bearing edges. I attach pieces of newspaper to the top and bottom to prevent any
over-spray from hitting the inside of the shell. Next comes the Primer.

2. If you're going to use light colors, use a light/white Primer. For dark
colors use a dark/grey Primer. Using the appropriate Primer will make the colors
you use to really Pop.

3. After Primer, sand everything smooth with 00-00 steel wool pads. One good
coat of a quality spray Primer followed by sanding with 00-00 wool should be
enough.

4. It is much better to spray several light coats of color sanding with 00-00
steel wool in between coats, than it is to paint one or two heavy coats. Resist
the temptation to continue adding paint. Add a light coat, sand, add another
light coat, sand, etc. Repeat that a minimum of three times (as many as four or
five times) and what you end up with is deep, rich color with a smooth
professional finish and look.

5. A high gloss clear coat to seal the paint is recommended but not absolutely
necessary. Krylon makes a quality high gloss lacquer. After 3 - 5 coats of it,
you don't really need the clear coat. I only recommend it to protect the finish.
It is a drum after all and it's going to be moved around and handled.

Of course it goes without saying that you should only work with lacquers in a
well ventilated area and you should wear a good face mask. Make sure you're
nowhere near open flames of any kind.


The Duco Machine:

The element that makes this possible at all is a simple turntable. I'm sure
almost everybody has an old turntable stashed away collecting dust in a closet
or basement somewhere. If you don't have one, a quick trip to Good Will or the
Second Hand store will turn one up for just a couple of bucks. The point is; you
need to be able to spin the drum as you paint. Any kind of Lazy-Susan set up you
can create will do. An old turntable is just perfect.

I put my truntable into a plastic trash bag and sealed with tape. I then cut a
cross over the plate and tucked the plastic - under the plate. The only thing I
left exposed is the top part of the spinning plate. Trim the plastic a little so
it doesn't get caught on the spinning post underneath. As long as it spins
freely, you're in business.

I left the turntable switch in the 'on' position. Set the speed to 33 1/3 RPM. I
also had to tape the tone arm in place close to the plate so that the turntable
would automatically start when I give it y. I controlled the on and
off function by simply plugging or unplugging the power cord from the extension
cord. Simple.

I found a big box and I threw a tarp over it. I set the turntable on top of the
box. I then taped a thin 24" square of particle board to the turntable plate to
act as a base to set the drums on. It's important to make sure that everything
is perfectly centered in order to eliminate wobble of the shell as it spins.


I'd like to recommend Krylon high gloss spray lacquers for the job. The colors
are deep and rich and the spray nozzle produces a fine mist. The Krylon rattle
cans have the best spray nozzles I've seen. This becomes a critical factor when
you try to create the fade at the border between the colors.

I've created a couple of illustrations that should make easy to take on board.
It's not hard to do and if you have a good eye and a steady hand, you'll be
blown away by the really pro looking results. It also has the advantage of being
cheaper than paying somebody else to do it. Besides, it gives you some very cool
bragging rights!

Step 1 -

I did a little homework before I started the job. I visited quite a few sites
that are all about how to do custom fade paint jobs on automobiles. One rule I
learned immediately was; always lay down the lighter color first when creating a
fade. I just followed the pro's foot prints in the snow. My fade came out great.

Step 2-

Paint the dark while the lighter color center stripe is still wet/tacky. It
helps the fade if the paint is wet enough to mix as it dries. Start at the top
edge holding the spray can steady and slowly tilt the spray down until it just
meets/touches the center stripe, then -STOP spraying-. Allow the drum to
continue spinning for another minute before pulling the plug. The spinning and
air drying helps spread the paint evenly and cuts down on drying time.

I looked at a dozen or more photos of vintage Duco kits. Consistently, the
center stripe is the same width as the Bowtie lugs. So I used the lug holes on
my spinning drums to know when to start and stop the colors. As the holes spin,
your eye sees an uninterrupted line. Instant visual guide! Easy.

I hope you try this. Practice on some orphans. You may end up with a killer
looking orphan kit that's a keeper.

John
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  #2  
Old 08-10-2011, 04:19 PM
grantro grantro is offline
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Cool Re: Tutorial: How To Du Duco Paint-jobs!

Super job Purdie on the kit!! Thanks for posting this "How to" guide...These are great tips!!

Cheers
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  #3  
Old 08-10-2011, 04:29 PM
GG Vintage GG Vintage is offline
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Default Re: Tutorial: How To Du Duco Paint-jobs!

Wow!! Thanks for the great tutorial on how to do Duco. I never would have thought to do the light color first, and the turntable idea...super. Your green and gold kit is beautiful.
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  #4  
Old 08-10-2011, 06:09 PM
jccabinets jccabinets is offline
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Default Re: Tutorial: How To Du Duco Paint-jobs!

Thats great! I just sprayed some interiors of my Stewart kit today using a turntable I made with a lazy suzan bearing. I use it for spraying cabinet doors, beats walking around in a circle. I have to spin it by hand. As I was doing the drums today I was thinking it sure would be nice if the table would spin by its self. This is a great idea, I have an old Technics turntable but I use it still (old school). I will certainly consider looking for an old crapy one for this purpose.

Thanks!
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  #5  
Old 08-10-2011, 07:51 PM
Purdie Shuffle Purdie Shuffle is offline
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Default Re: Tutorial: How To Du Duco Paint-jobs!

Don't use your good turntable for this. These days you can pick up an old belt-driven turntable at the Goodwill for around $5. Set it at 33 1/3 and you're good to go.

This system also works great for two-tone stain jobs where you want the top and bottom of the shell dark stain and the center lighter. It's just a great way to get nice even spray finishes. I really hope some of you try it for yourselves.

A lot more great old kits can be saved and put back into circulation if more guys would take the time to learn some of these easy to do restoration techniques.

John
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  #6  
Old 08-10-2011, 08:18 PM
rogersfreek rogersfreek is offline
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Default Re: Tutorial: How To Du Duco Paint-jobs!

I was going to use the turntable idea when I try to replicate the Mardi Gras

finish. I'm going to first experiment with cardboard cylinders, such as the

ones used for concrete forms. They come in different diameters. I'm

first, going to paint the cylinder black, and then "blow" on different shapes

of glitter, found in party/greeting card stores. i have located most of the

glitter shapes needed to reproduce this 1960's look. Has anybody out

there tried this????
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  #7  
Old 08-10-2011, 09:56 PM
Purdie Shuffle Purdie Shuffle is offline
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Default Re: Tutorial: How To Du Duco Paint-jobs!

How are you going to apply the do-dads? The auto guys use an air brush gun with a special attachment to accommodate the course little chips of plastic.

Interesting idea. If you go for it, please start a thread so we can follow the process from start to finish. I'd love to see that.

John
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  #8  
Old 08-11-2011, 12:48 AM
mike17 mike17 is offline
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Default Re: Tutorial: How To Du Duco Paint-jobs!

rogersfreek;
your post got me thinking.
i am going to start another thread so we don't hijack this one.
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  #9  
Old 08-11-2011, 05:11 PM
rogersfreek rogersfreek is offline
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Default Re: Tutorial: How To Du Duco Paint-jobs!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Purdie Shuffle View Post
How are you going to apply the do-dads? The auto guys use an air brush gun with a special attachment to accommodate the course little chips of plastic.

Interesting idea. If you go for it, please start a thread so we can follow the process from start to finish. I'd love to see that.

John
I'm planning on using a clear squeeze bottle with a tube attatched that will

allow the glitter to be "floated" on the shell's surface. Years ago, drywallers

used to apply silver glitter to ceilings to reflect light down to a room. This is

how I'm going to begin to apply the glitter to a shell (much trail and error

of course!)
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  #10  
Old 08-11-2011, 05:41 PM
jccabinets jccabinets is offline
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Default Re: Tutorial: How To Du Duco Paint-jobs!

Boy you guys have really got my wheels turning, turning, get it, turning. Ha Ha. Seriously, this forum is a great place to share everyones ideas and experiences. The man that taught me the carpenter trade always said you need to work with as many other carpenters that you can or will only learn what I know!

Jeff
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